Brief 

White Arkitekter recently completed an ambitious timber building named Nodi. The mixed-use office has an unusual overall form that increases in width as it rises and looks almost like it has been turned upside-down.

 

Insight 

White Arkitekter, the firm behind the Sara Cultural Centre, recently completed another ambitious timber building. Named Nodi, the mixed-use office has an unusual overall form that increases in width as it rises and looks almost like it has been turned upside-down.

Nodi is located in Gothenburg, Sweden, and rises to a height of 25.2 m (82 ft). Structurally, it consists of a glued laminated timber (glulam) frame, as well as prefabricated wooden panels, and glazing – there’s no mention of whether concrete is also used for structural support.

According to developer Next Step, if you arranged its load-bearing and visible glulam structural elements, end-to-end, they would stretch out some 6 km (3.7 miles). As well as lending it such an eye-catching appearance, the top-heavy design has a practical purpose and helps reduce glare.

“The five stories cantilever out and become larger with each floor, especially towards the south and west,” explains White Arkitekter. ‘In this way, the design of the [office] contributes to a better indoor climate and protects against the sun’s glaring rays without shutting out the light.

The slats together with the large glass sections on the entrance level provide transparency to the interior space and provide an inviting focal point for passers-by. On the street level there are premises for shops that become a natural part of the popular Hovås Allé street. And at the very top, overlooking Nya Hovås and its surroundings, all the building’s tenants can enjoy the lush roof terrace and a spacious communal kitchenette.”

 

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