Brief

Vincent Callebaut has unveiled a proposal for a new mixed-use residential development made primarily from timber. Named Archiborescence, it would include lots of greenery and boast sustainability features like solar and wind power.

 

Insight

Following news of his DNA-inspired tower nearing completion, Vincent Callebaut has unveiled a proposal for a new mixed-use residential development that would be made primarily from timber. Named Archiborescence, the project showcases the architect’s knack for blending nature and architecture, with lots of greenery and sustainability features like solar power and wind turbines.

Archiborescence (named by combining architecture and arborescence – or tree-like in appearance) is slated for the site of a former school in Lille, France, and would consist of a series of low-rise buildings measuring a total of 14,465 sq m (155,700 sq ft). This would be split into residential space, a hotel, office space, a gym with climbing wall and yoga facilities, and retail areas.

The project would be constructed using CLT (cross-laminated timber). This is primarily chosen to reduce the carbon footprint of the project but Vincent Callebaut Architectures says it offers other practical benefits too, such as, counterintuitively, improved fire safety.

This claim chimes with what we’ve been told previously by timber construction experts. The firm also says that the project would involve the renovation of existing buildings, but it’s not clear what would be retained.

 

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